Today’s post is about the remains of air defense hardware on Kildin Island.

The objects in the first two pictures are difficult for me to identify. They might be the remains of a Pischal target-missile or some part of an S-125 Neva/Pechora. Or maybe of a smaller missile belonging to a ground force air defense system, something like a 2K12 M4.

A knocked-over 76N6 radio detector. It was designed for locating inbound and outbound targets, including cruise missiles equipped with small reflecting surfaces on low altitudes in the conditions of radar clutter and jamming warfare.

The station’s operation is computerized and provides target assigning for the air-defense missile system on localized targets with respect to speed, distance and azimuth position.

The top part of the bar and the radar’s “head”.

Anti-aircraft machine guns characteristic of WWII. Sadly, the barrels have been dismantled.

The remains of an S-300 launching pad. The tail part of a rocket is lying next to it — it is possible see the stabilizing fins and the jet nozzle.

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The tail parts of La-17M target missiles, a.k.a. Soviet drones.

The La-17 pilotless target aircraft that was modified for installation of a RD-9BK turbojet engine was dubbed La-17M. Engine replacement and installation of two PRD-23M solid propellant booster rockets led to an abundance of available power near the ground.

This allowed to replace a bulky Tu-4 carrier plane used for launching with a PU-17M ground launch pad that was based on a KS-19 100 mm antiaircraft gun mount.

5B27-type rocket transit packaging. Lots of it. They were used with the S-125 system.

Handling trolleys.

Vaulted constructions used as military hardware storage facility and the command headquarters.

A missile stage mating manual.

Entrances and exits to and from some secret underground vaults.

Images by RALPH MIREBS, reproduced with permission

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